Tag: woodland nursery

DIY WOODLAND NURSERY CURTAINS

Learn how to easily make DIY woodland nursery curtains. Perfect for any nursery with the optimal balance between light filtering and blackout curtains.


This post contains affiliate links used to help support The Bluebonnet Farmhouse. For more information, please see my disclosures here.


Let’s just start off with what might be a controversial topic. Blackout curtains in a nursery, or no?

How about we meet in the middle and get the best of both worlds!

My logic was, if my son can fall asleep in the car or stroller with the sun blaring, then he should be capable of falling asleep in a semi-dark room with blinds and curtains. The goal was to have curtains that darkened the room some in hopes of helping make nap time a little easier, but also let in just enough light so that our son would not grow accustomed to only being able to sleep in a pitch black room.

Some may say that the blackout curtains help little ones to nap during the day or sleep longer in the mornings and not be woken up by the sun… if only that were true. Three years later and our son still wakes up like clock work no matter how late he stayed up or if the sun is still sleeping.

Seeing as how I have a slight obsession with flannel and it is a heavy weight fabric that could work great for curtains, I decided to try it out. I have never seen nor heard of flannel curtains, but that didn’t stop me from giving it a go and I am so glad it didn’t!

The flannel fabric ended up being the best choice for our woodland nursery curtains! Not only are is the pattern adorable, but the fabric provides the optimal balance between light filtering and blackout curtains. The curtains are heavy and dark enough to block most of the light, but the lighter portions of the flannel allowed for subtle filtered light to peak through.

These DIY woodland nursery curtains were the finishing touch and beautifully framed our woodland nursery signs.

The curtains are designed to provide two different ways of hanging – a rod pocket or clip rings.

VARIATIONS OF THIS PROJECT:

  • Add tabs to the back for a different hanging option.
  • Customize the appliques with a different animal, flowers, trees, etc.
  • Keep it simple and skip the appliques.

SUPPLIES

  • Flannel Fabric (the amount needed for the desired height and number of panels)
  • Drop Cloth
  • Bear Applique
  • Paper
  • Thread
  • Fabric Scissors
  • Measuring Tape
  • Pins
  • Iron
  • Sewing Machine

If you would like to use a Cricut for the bear applique pattern:

HOW TO MAKE DIY WOODLAND NURSERY CURTAINS:

MEASURE AND CUT FABRIC

Begin by laundering and ironing all fabric to be used for the curtains.

All of the bedrooms in our base housing were on the second floor, which had 8′ ceilings. With that being said, I custom made these curtains to be hung by clip rings and not gathered on the floor. Therefore, my curtains are 92″ (7’8″) long.

The full width of the fabric was used to determine the curtain width. In my case, the width was 44″ based off of the flannel fabric used.

All measurements stated in this tutorial are based off of this length and width (44″ x 92″). Simply add or subtract some fabric to either the drop cloth or flannel portion to get the length that works for your space.

Measure and cut 81″ panels from the main fabric – I used flannel.

Measure and cut 44″ x 15″ pieces from the drop cloth. You will only need one for each curtain panel.

Since our son’s nursery had two windows, I cut four pieces of both the flannel and drop cloth.

Iron all of the fabric pieces to be used. Next, fold over the top 3″ of the drop cloth and iron down. This is going to create the rod loop for the curtains.

BEAR APPLIQUE

There are two ways to cut out your bear appliques:

  • print and cut the pattern from the computer
  • or cut a pattern using a Cricut.

Once you have the bear patterns cut out of paper, lay them on the leftovers of your main fabric and cut out one of each bear for each curtain panel. Again, I had four panels so I needed four of each bear – papa, mama, and baby.

Pin the bears onto the drop cloth and stitch around each using the overcasting stitch on your machine. I recommend doing a test stitch to see what size stitch width and length you like for this application.

SEW THE MAIN PIECE

Instead of a true hem, I chose to leave frayed edges around the curtains.

Using the straight stitch, sew 1/4″ from the edges around the main fabric. Slightly fray the fabric all around.

SEW THE HEADER

Pin the top of the main fabric to the bottom of the drop cloth on the backside with a 1″ overlap.

Drop cloth has a tendency to fray easier than other fabrics. Because of this, I elected to sew 1/2″ away from the edges to allow for any excess fraying to take place.

Using a decorative stitch and a contrasting thread color, sew 1/2″ from the edges around the drop cloth. Again, I recommend doing a test stitch to see what size stitch width and length you like for this application.

My decorative stitching is 1/4″ wide with the outer edge being 1/2″ away from the edge of the drop cloth.

Make sure to sew along the bottom of the rod pocket (3″ fold over) and not the top edge. Slightly fray the fabric all around.

Use clip rings or the rod pocket to hang your beautiful new curtains.


Simple, right?! I have to admit, I was nervous to try and take on the task of sewing curtains. Due to the fact that curtains consist of very large pieces of fabric and are a focal point in a room, I really didn’t want to mess them up. Thankfully, they ended up being incredibly easy and the hardest part was measuring out the long panels to make sure the pattern wasn’t crooked.

We have enjoyed these curtains hanging in our son’s nursery for the last three years, and my hope is that you can do the same with yours!

MORE DIY NURSERY PROJECTS:

Thank you so much for stopping by! Happy Sewing!

We wanna see those sewing skills! Comment below or tag us on social media to share your curtains with us!

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“IT’S A LOVE WITHOUT END, AMEN” – WOODLAND NURSERY SIGNS

"it's a love without end, amen" woodland nursery signs

Learn how to make these DIY woodland nursery signs! Inspired by George Strait’s song – Love Without End, Amen – and the endless love shared between a parent and their child.

"it's a love without end, amen" DIY woodland nursery signs

This post contains affiliate links used to help support The Bluebonnet Farmhouse. For more information, please see my disclosures here.


When designing our son’s nursery, I had been seeing all sorts of wood signs available on Etsy with cute phrases and woodland animals. Being a natural-born DIYer, I had instantly already made the decision to make our own woodland nursery signs.

For me, DIY isn’t always about saving money, but putting in the time and love to make it. This is one of those instances.

We wanted something special that served as a reminder of a simple, yet cherished truth each day.

And that is how these woodland nursery signs came to be.

"It's a love without end, amen" woodland nursery signs

Country + Christian. That pretty much sums up the genre of music that plays in this household. So when I was trying to figure out what words to paint onto our son’s woodland nursery signs, I thought what better words than those from George Strait’s song – Love Without End, Amen.

Those four words say everything. Everything about the endless love shared between our son and his daddy, mommy, and Heavenly Father.

After having completed our floating corner shelves, we made sure to add some black bears to continue on with the woodland theme in our son’s nursery.

VARIATIONS OF THIS PROJECT:

  • Use vinyl instead of paint and a stencil.
  • Customize the signs with a different animal, flowers, trees, etc.
  • Forego the chains and hang the signs arranged either horizontally or vertically.
  • Use 1×4 project boards for clean 90 degree edges.
  • Rip the rounded edges off of 1×4 furring strips with a table saw to get clean 90 degree edges. Rip .25″ off each side. Boards will then be 3″ wide instead of 3.5″.

TWO WAYS TO MAKE THE STENCILS:

There are two different ways to make the stencils: using a Cricut or by hand with an X-Acto knife (or something similar).

If making the stencils by hand, you can download your free printable here and follow along below. But I personally would highly recommend the Cricut seeing as how it is much easier and will save you a lot of time!

SUPPLIES:

HOW TO MAKE WOODLAND NURSERY SIGNS:

STEP 1 – MAKE THE CUTS

1×4 CUTS

We used the width of the 1×4 to help determine the size of the signs. Going based off of the 3.5″ width of the boards, we cut the 1x4s to be 14″ long and placed 4 boards together for each sign to make a 14″ x 14″ square.

Using the 1×4, we cut (4) 14″ boards for each sign, giving us a total of 12 boards.

1×2 CUTS

Rather than having the signs lay flat against the wall, we chose to float them using 1×2 furring strips.

Using the 1×2, cut (2) 11.5″ boards for each sign. There will be a total of 6 boards.

STEP 2 – PREP THE HARDWARE

Before assembling the signs, I attached one eye screw into the top and bottom of each 1×2 board.

NOTE: The bottom sign will not need eye screws on the bottoms of the 1×2 pieces.

I went ahead and measured out (4) 4.75″ strands of the chain to go between the signs, and (1) 8.25″ strand to go across the top for hanging. Using needle nose pliers, I opened the links of the chain to separate the strands.

STEP 3 – ASSEMBLE THE SIGNS

Laying 4 of the 1×4 boards on the ground, I placed 2 of the 1×2 boards perpendicular along the back – 2″ in from each side and 1.25″ from top and bottom.

Using a drill, we screwed (4) 1.25″ screws through each 1×2 board to attach the 1×4 boards.

You could choose to attach the chains now or wait until after staining and painting.

construction of woodland nursery signs

STEP 4 – STAIN THE SIGNS

If you have seen our ultrasound picture frame and DIY pipe shelf posts, then you already know we decided to use Minwax Red Mahogany for our stain color in the nursery. This stain perfectly matched the top of the dresser we were using, not to mention we already had a leftover bucket of it from my dad, and eliminating the need to buy new stain!

We have since switched to and highly recommend this non-toxic brand! They even have a craft stain that is made for this kind of project.

Don’t forget to sand the signs according to the staining instructions before eagerly reaching for that staining rag! Something we have failed to do in the past and have since learned from our mistakes.

STEP 5 – MAKE THE STENCILS

To make the stencils, I simply used some cardstock paper and my Cricut to easily make custom designs specifically for this project.

If you do not have a Cricut, you can get the printable version here and cut them out with an X-Acto knife. But I personally would highly recommend the Cricut seeing as how it is much easier and will save you a lot of time!

stencil placed in desired location on sign
Lay the cutout pieces on the signs to get a visual for where you want them located.

To get started with your Cricut, you will need the Cricut Design Space app on your computer and the Woodland Nursery Signs project file.

If you need help setting up the file and going through the cutting process, check out this post for a step-by-step tutorial.

stencils placed on wood sign in preparation of painting
Place your stencils where the cutouts were located in preparation for painting.

STEP 6 – PAINT THE SIGNS

The colors chosen were the same as those used in our nursery painted wood letters. All I did was mix the paints to get the desired shades of gray. Below are the colors used:

Once I had my paint colors, I laid the paper stencils in place on each sign and began to paint.

I was careful to keep paint out of both the seams and knots in the wood as I wanted those to remain stained and highlight the natural character of the wood and signs.

"It's a Love" woodlands nursery sign completed
"Without End" woodland nursery sign completed
"Amen" woodland nursery sign completed

STEP 7 – INSTALLATION

At this point is when I chose to attach the strands of chain to the signs.

When our son was just a baby, we did not have the 8.25″ chain along the top of the sign in order to hang it. We simply used some nails to hang the signs by the eye screws at the top of the first sign.

Once our son became mobile and getting into everything, we wanted the signs to be more childproof. So we added the 8.25″ chain along the top and swapped out the nails for two drywall anchors and screws. Then we used the needle nose pliers to open two of the chain links of the hanging strand to wrap them around the head of the screw.

closeup of screws and drywall anchors used for hanging the woodland nursery signs

woodland nursery signs hanging on wall of nursery
I apologize for the horrific photo quality… I didn’t realize just how terrible this photo was until after we moved.

These signs make me beary happy (sorry, I had to) and I love that they have so much meaning to them.

I am a big advocate of decor having meaning or a story behind it, otherwise how much purpose does it serve? If there is no sentiment, there is no sentimental value. Therefore, it is essentially just there for looks and easily replaceable.

I treasure these woodland nursery signs and I hope they bring inspiration for your own treasured nursery decor.

Looking for more budget-friendly DIY projects? Check out our posts below!

MORE DIY NURSERY PROJECTS:

Thanks for stopping by! Happy Building!

Share your finished signs with us! Comment below or tag us on social media to share with us!

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